Thursday, April 17, 2014

Gather Your Family





Genealogy tip for the day: Gather Your Family Conference

If you live in Northwest Arkansas, be sure and come to the annual "Gather Your Family" genealogy conference. It will be held April 19th, all day from 8:00 to 5:00 pm. The conference is held at the Springdale LDS church at 6731 Lynch Prairie Cove in Springdale, Arkansas.

Marilyn Collins will be the main speaker. Marilyn is a local author and expert on writing your family history. Collins is the author of, “You Can Write a Book about Your Family” and “Memoir Writing Guide: Brighten Your Leaf on the Family Tree” They are available in both e-book and print format from CHS Publishing.

For more information on the event please visit: Gather Your Family. Here you can register, get directions, see what workshops are being offered and the schedule for the day. There is no cost. You will need to provide your own lunch. This is open to anyone interested in genealogy and will not be used as a means of proselytizing. Come see what you can learn.



“History is who we are; Genealogy is who I am” sg



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Today’s Recipe
April – Tomato Month

·                                 Perp Time: 20 minutes
·                                 Cook Time:
·                                 Total Time: 30 minutes
·                                 Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1 cup)

Ingredients

  • 4 cups tomato juice (such as Campbell's Organic Tomato Juice)
  • 2 cups chopped seeded tomato
  • 1 3/4 cups chopped seeded unpeeled cucumber
  • 1 cup finely chopped yellow bell pepper
  • 1 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil

Preparation

1. Combine all ingredients except basil in a large bowl; cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours before serving.
2. Ladle the gazpacho into soup bowls; top with basil.



Apr 1st   Caprese Stacks




ENJOY!

Now You Know!


  

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Blood Moon






Genealogy tip for the day: Blood Moon

Did you get to see the lunar eclipse on Monday night/Tuesday morning? What an unusual astronomical event that was!!! I hope you not only got to see it, but in someway able to document it. Your future generations would love to know what you thought of the event or if you even got to see it.

Did you ever stop to think that your ancestors also may have witnessed special events like this in their life time?  I know my father was a very young boy when Haley's comet came though - 'time before last.'  He said what he remembered about it was all the family members and friends talking about it. He was quite young and doesn't remember seeing it.

It's these types of things that can enhance your story about your ancestors that make reading about them just that much more interesting. What have some of your ancestors seen?


“History is who we are; Genealogy is who I am” sg



Like what you read? Let us know.



 

 

Today’s Recipe
April – Tomato Month
·                                 Perp Time: 5 minutes
·                                 Cook Time: 15 minutes
·                                 Total Time: 20 minutes
·                                 Yield: Makes 4 servings (1 serving: about 2 cups)  

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pound whole wheat pasta shells
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 shallot, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 (5-ounce) package baby spinach
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup half and half
  • 1 ounce grated Pecorino Romano cheese, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 (8-ounce) container grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise
  • 1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley
  •  

Preparation

1. Cook pasta according to package directions.
2. Meanwhile, heat butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallot and crushed red pepper; reduce heat to medium-low, and cook for 1–2 minutes or until translucent. Add spinach and broth; cover and cook for 1 minute. Add half-and-half, 3⁄4 of the cheese, and the black pepper. Stir to combine; cook for 3 minutes. Remove from heat.
3. Add tomatoes and the cooked pasta; toss. Garnish with parsley and remaining cheese. Serve.

Apr 1st   Caprese Stacks




ENJOY!

 Now You Know!



Monday, April 14, 2014

Networking


Networking helps put the pieces of the puzzle together.


Genealogy tip for the day: Networking

Have you ever heard the phrase, 'it's now what you know, but who you know'?? That plays out in every situation you find yourself in. You will find it is true in genealogy research as well.

I started my journey in 1984 when my grandfather, L.S. Van Gorder had passed away and my mother was sorting her parent's papers. We all knew who his father and his grandfather were, but the trail quickly turned cold.  I had no idea where to begin looking.

I put his line on the back burner and concentrated on other family lines. But what I did do was to post on Rootsweb and other websites. There you can find other people interested in the same surname as you. In my case, I found a lady who had researched her Van Gorden line and had information about the person who came to this country from Holland and from whom various lines with various spellings had descended, including Van Gorders.

We corresponded over time and she also put me in touch with her father. Eventually he helped me to put the pieces together and I discovered L.S. Van Gorder had a great grandfather named Jonathan. AND, it tied me back to the original settler from Holland.

On February 6, 1979, I gave birth to a son, and I had named him Jonathan. He was the only one, I thought, that wasn't named after someone in the family. Sometime in the early 90's, I found out - it was in the family after all!

You never know when networking with people can pay off, but sometimes you have to be patient and give it time! The reward is awesome.


“History is who we are; Genealogy is who I am” sg



Like what you read? Let us know.





Today’s Recipe
April – Tomato Month



Ingredients
5 tablespoons olive oil
7 sheets phyllo dough, thawed if frozen
8 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced
1/4 cup crumbled feta
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper


Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Brush a rimmed baking sheet with olive oil. Unroll phyllo sheets and cover with a clean kitchen towel. Place a sheet of phyllo on baking sheet and lightly brush entire surface with olive oil. (It won't matter if phyllo tears slightly.) Top with a second sheet of phyllo, keeping remaining sheets covered, and brush with olive oil. Repeat stacking and brushing until all phyllo has been used. Reserve any extra oil.

2. Arrange tomato slices decoratively on phyllo in a single layer, leaving a 1/4-inch border on all sides. Sprinkle feta over the top, then sprinkle with thyme and rosemary and season with salt and pepper. Drizzle any remaining olive oil over top.

3. Bake tart until edges are golden brown and phyllo is crisp, about 30 minutes. Let tart cool in pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board, cut into 12 squares and serve warm.

Apr 1st   Caprese Stacks








ENJOY!

Now You Know!




Friday, April 11, 2014

Common Mistakes, 5






Genealogy tip for the day: Common Mistakes, 5

Today will conclude our look at mistakes and wrong assumptions that we all make. Maybe this trip down the road of mistakes will help you miss the potholes!!

#34. Ignoring Siblings. We sometimes get so focused on the direct line that we forget that sometimes a brick wall, or a difficulty may be solved by researching our grandparents' siblings. If you have a question that seems to have no answer, look at the brothers and sisters and see if they will lead you to the answer you are looking for.

#35. Overlooking maiden names. Granted on the one hand, sometimes maiden names can be hard to pin down. But at the same time, when you have it, don't ignore it. Watch however and don't assume a bride's last name before marriage is her maiden name. It could be she was married before. You'll have go back one step further and find the previous marriage. When finding the maiden name, it will then help you find the parents.

#36. Jumping to conclusions with out documentation can lead to disaster. There may be a situation where a lot of things seem to indicate a conclusion, but in the end you have to have proof before you can say with certainty such-and-such as fact.

#37. Chasing the wrong family. This can waste a lot of time and money. This is sometimes a result of jumping to conclusions and not proven what you have so far. In the end you've ended up with a wild goose chase. You will be very unhappy with yourself if you discovered you have done this. Making several mistakes we have mentioned in this series can cause you to end up chasing the wrong family. Not documenting, making assumptions, yet not thinking outside of the box.

#38. Don't think you can keep track of everything in your head. Remember that every time you go back a generation, you've doubled the people. And that's just the direct ancestors. This doesn't include siblings, cousins etc. If you are computer literate (and you probably to some extent if you are reading this), then research and look into different genealogy software and see what appeals to you. Or, you can record your information on paper forms. There are several styles and many are found on the Internet free.

#39. Don't assume that women with the same surname as their father aren't married. I personally went to school with a gal that married a fellow that had the exact same last name as her. They were no relation whatsoever. Again, it's those assumptions that can get you into trouble.

#40. Don't assume a family never moved if you found them in the same area for birth and marriage, or marriage and death, etc. Sometimes folks will move away and then later return to a previous location. Check out where other relatives may have lived and see if there is a connection.

#41. Speaking of moving, it may seem like a family moved several times when in fact they never moved at all, but boundary lines did. This can effect county lines, state lines and maybe even national boundaries.

As a "sort of" an example, I have an ancestor who was born in Canada. Later that geographical area became part of New York State. So national lines can move just as much as lower governmental boundaries.

This concludes our look at mistakes to avoid and assumptions not to make and the like. I hope this has been helpful to you. Next week, we'll find something else to share with you. Come see what we decided.



“History is who we are; Genealogy is who I am” sg



Like what you read? Let us know.






Today’s Recipe
April – Tomato Month





Ingredients

·  1/4 cup grated Parmesan
·  1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
·  1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
·  1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
·  1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
·  2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
·  12 1/2-inch-thick tomato slices, from 6 medium tomatoes
·   

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment. In a small bowl, combine Parmesan, oregano, salt, pepper and garlic powder. Add olive oil and stir to form a moist mixture.
2. Arrange tomato slices on baking sheet and spoon a heaping 1/2 tsp. Parmesan mixture on top of each slice, dividing evenly. Use your fingertips to press into an even layer. Bake until tomatoes are soft and topping begins to brown, about 20 minutes. Serve hot or warm.


Apr 1st   Caprese Stacks


ENJOY!

Now You Know!




Thursday, April 10, 2014

Common Mistakes, 4


 
 
 
Genealogy tip for the day: Common Mistakes, 4

 

Today, we are continuing our look at mistakes that either we make ourselves, or errors made by assumption. We are up to #25.

 

#26. Given names are gender specific. Wrong Assumption! Normally this is the case but it is not always the case. I have known a lot of Jerry's, Bobbie's and other similar names in my life time that were not guys. I also had a professor named Jan who was a "Mister". Beverly can sometimes be a male name. An example of that is the gospel singer, George Beverly Shea. Although for the most part names are gender indicative, don't let that box you in.

 

#27. Failure to accurately record your information.  When transferring new information into your records whether paper or computer, you should read and reread it 2-3 times. If possible let it cold and come back again and check. Another option, if you have someone interested, have another person read what you've transcribed. There's probably nothing worse than perpetuating the wrong information. It is very hard to correct.

 

#28. If you do not know a name or a date, or place, don't make one up. Don't assume you know the answer. Abnormalities and oddities happen all the time. People never do follow the same pattern or routine.

 

#29. Blindly trusting others' research. See #27! You should always check out new information, especially someone else's research. You must find out how they documented their information, if they did. Only then can you trust their information.

 

#30. Don't need more than one copy!! BAD mistake. Even if you have your information on your computer, you should have redundant backup information, and NOT on your computer. I had a friend who kept one back up in a fire box and another one at the bank. You don't need to do this daily but periodically. It would be easier to put a month's worth of work back into your research than to have to redo all of it. (Been there, done that!)

 

#31. Skipping Generations. The only place you can get away with that is in the Bible. Some generations were actually from grandfather to grandson, or great grandson. But you can't do that in genealogy today if you want your work to be believable and trustworthy.  Sometimes we don't do this intentionally but by making assumptions.

 

#32. I don't need a goal, I'm just going to start with me and take off! Wrong Assumption. You can end up chasing down a whole lot of rabbit trails. You need to have some kind of goal, even if you revise it from time to time. Who of us haven't done that already. My goal is to "get to the pond" (the person who came to this country). Occasionally I have fallen into information I wasn't expecting, so I didn't pass it up just because it was beyond my goal, but for the most part it does help guide my research.

 

#33. There is no standard way of recording information. Wrong Assumption, again. You need to follow the rules, play according to Hoyle, keep it kosher - whatever you want to call it.

 

As for people's names, that may depend on the form or software you are using, but be consistant. Dates are ALWAYS small to large, i.e. day - month - year. This is sometimes called the military way or the continental way. It is also called the genealogical way.

 

Locations follow the same pattern - small to large. Town (or maybe township), county, state. For another country or states that do not have "counties" but call them something else, it is still the smaller to larger direction you record them.

 

Well, let's let that kind of settle in for today and we'll finish up tomorrow with the last 8 that we have.

 

 

 

“History is who we are; Genealogy is who I am” sg

 

 

 

Like what you read? Let us know.

 

 
 
 

 


Today’s Recipe

April – Tomato Month

 
 

 

Ingredients


·  4 cups cherry or grape tomatoes
·  4 sprigs fresh thyme
·  2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
·  1 shallot, thinly sliced
·  1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
·  1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
·  1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
·   

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 250°F. Arrange cherry tomatoes in a single layer in a 9-by-13-inch glass or ceramic baking dish. Top with thyme sprigs, garlic and shallot; season with salt and pepper. Drizzle with olive oil and stir to combine.
2. Bake, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes pop and ooze, 2 1/2 to 3 hours. Remove baking dish from the oven and discard thyme sprigs. Use immediately or let cool and transfer to a covered container. Refrigerate until ready to use. Tomatoes will keep for 3 days.

 

 

 


Apr 1st   Caprese Stacks







 

 

ENJOY!

 

Now You Know!

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Intermission




Genealogy tip for the day: Intermission

 

Big Announcements here at BBB. It's a new day at BBB! Our blog has now become independent of the Rogers Public Library. From this day forward it will be my personal blog regarding genealogy. We will continue to give tips, lessons, and other helpful information. Also I will journal my own journey in this fascinating, obsessing avocation! Stay on board for more exciting adventures.



At the bottom you will continue to find a new menu for the day. If this changes we will let you know! (We are taking a break today, but will return to sharing great food with you tomorrow.)



Tomorrow we will continue our series on Common Mistakes people make or need to avoid in family history research!!
 
 
 
“History is who we are; Genealogy is who I am” sg
 
 
 
Like what you read? Let us know.
 


 
Today’s Recipe
April – Tomato Month
 
Our daily recipe's will return tomorrow. I've got a whole list of them lined up waiting to be shared! Be sure to keep watch.
 
Apr 1st   Caprese Stacks
Apr 8th (Intermission)
 
ENJOY!
 
Now You Know!